Game Wardens Tag

Author Steven T. Callan and his wife, Kathy

Thank You

Author Steven T. Callan and his wife, Kathy

Hi, Everyone,

I’d like to take this opportunity to thank all of you for supporting my writing adventure. Kathy and I have thoroughly enjoyed meeting and talking with so many of you during our book tours throughout Northern and Central California. Thanks to you, Badges, Bears, and Eagles and The Game Warden’s Son have done extremely well. It’s because of your support, kind words, and encouragement that I’m now working on Book Number 3.

Author Steven T. Callan and friends at a book signing for The Game Warden's Son at the Redding Costco Store on February 4, 2017

Redding Costco Book Signing a Sellout

Author Steven T. Callan and friends at a book signing for The Game Warden's Son at the Redding Costco Store on February 4, 2017

Last Saturday’s Redding Costco book signing was special for Kathy and me. We had the opportunity to visit with many old friends, lots of wonderful new friends, and even a few future game wardens. We also sold out in record time. Thank you, everyone!

The next stop on our book tour is the Chico Costco, Saturday, February 11; I’ll be signing copies of The Game Warden’s Son and Badges, Bears, and Eagles.

Please scroll down to see more photos from the Redding Costco book signing.

Warden Wally Callan in the ghost town of Newville, California, circa 1962. Photo by Steven T. Callan.

Game Wardens and Ghost Towns

Warden Wally Callan in the ghost town of Newville, California, circa 1962. Photo by Steven T. Callan.

Warden Wally Callan in the ghost town of Newville, circa 1962. Photo by author.

Out of beer and three sheets to the wind, the three deer poachers turned west on Newville Road and headed northeast toward Paskenta. Rounding the first bend, they passed the ghost town of Newville. Newville had thrived from the early 1850s until 1929, when all but a few buildings burned to the ground. During its heyday, the little pioneer town boasted a general store, two livery stables, two saloons, a blacksmith shop, two hotels, a post office, a race track, and a service station. Now only the ramshackle, two-story Newville Hotel and the falling-down service station remained.

Author Steven T. Callan signing books for Wintu Audubon Society members

Presentation at Wintu Audubon Society

Author Steven T. Callan signing books for Wintu Audubon Society members

Signing books for Wintu Audubon Society members. Photo by Kathy Callan.

Last night I had the pleasure and privilege of giving a presentation to a packed house of Wintu Audubon Society members. In addition to discussing my current book and the upcoming sequel, The Game Warden’s Son—A Half Century of Protecting California’s Wildlife, we shared ideas about how our natural resources might be better protected. One of the suggestions for helping to finance more wardens in the field was a voluntary wildlife stamp for people who bird watch, hike, and enjoy nature’s wonders but don’t necessarily hunt or fish. This is an excellent idea, in my opinion, and one that would find favor, I believe, with sportsmen, nature enthusiasts, and game wardens alike.

Photo of Wally Callan on Newville Hotel porch

Game Wardens and Ghost Towns

Photo of Wally Callan on Newville Hotel porchWhile working on a sequel to Badges, Bears, and Eagles, I recently returned to my old stomping grounds near Orland, California, and the ghost town of Newville. Located twenty-two miles west of Orland, Newville thrived from the early 1850s until 1929, when all but a few buildings burned to the ground. During its heyday, Newville boasted a general store, two livery stables, two saloons, a blacksmith shop, two hotels, a post office, and at least one service station. I mention the service station because as of this week, it remains the only building left standing.